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90% of the All-Decade Team, Part II

Posted by Chase Stuart on July 1, 2009

Yesterday, we looked at my choices for the through-nine-years All-decade offense. Today, we'll do the same for the defense.

Even when the 3-4 defense was at its peak in the '80s, that All-Decade Team still selected four linemen and three linebackers (although it still chose three 3-4 players in its front seven). We'll do the same here, but we'll keep in mind that Pro Bowl and AP honors are less likely to be given to 3-4 linemen, which will drive their AV scores down, too.

Defensive Ends:

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	Sk Val	PLAYER
100	6	141	136	8	1	3	1	36.5	Jason Taylor
 78	4	113	112	8	1	2	2	34.5	Michael Strahan
 76 	5	111	105	7	0	3	1	 1.0	Richard Seymour
 71	4	106	106	7	1	2	1	23.0	Julius Peppers
 66	1	139	137	9	0	0	0	 0.0	Aaron Smith
 66	2	110	 99	7	0	1	1	28.0	Simeon Rice
 63	3	113	103	6	0	1	1	27.5	John Abraham
 62	2	128	127	8	0	1	1	19.5	Patrick Kerney
 59	1	112	105	7	0	0	0	12.0	Adewale Ogunleye
 58	4	103	 89	7	0	2	1	22.5	Dwight Freeney
 58	1	144	139	9	0	0	0	 4.5	Kevin Carter
 57	2	117	112	7	0	0	1	14.0	Aaron Schobel
 56	2	111	102	7	0	0	0	 8.5	Jevon Kearse
 54	1	123	106	7	0	0	0	 8.0	Mike Rucker
 53	3	 79	 65	4	0	1	1	13.5	Hugh Douglas
 53	2	 77	 71	5	0	2	0	19.5	Jared Allen


Taylor and Strahan have been the top DEs for most of this decade, and their AV scores reflect that. They were the only two DEs to win defensive player of the year awards this decade (Peppers' award was a rookie of the year honor). Dwight Freeney and Jared Allen (and Peppers) have two first team all-pro nominations each, and could pick up a third this season; but for now, they're a notch below the top guys.

I've also included a column at the end called sack value, which is a quick and simple way to measure pass rusher dominance. I gave each DE credit for his sacks in a season above half his number of games played. So 16 sacks in a 16 game season is +8; so is 12 sacks in a 8 game season. I simply added up the number of "sacks over 0.5 games played" for each defensive end to get a sense of how dominant they were at getting to the quarterback. Once again, Taylor and Strahan stand out. As 3-4 DEs, we can't penalize Seymour and Smith for not putting up big sack numbers, and AV is a better (but not perfect) way to grade them.

There's no doubt that 3-4 defensive ends are at an unfair disadvantage when it comes to Pro Bowls and All Pro honors, and we should have one on our roster. Seymour has achieved more fame than most 3-4 ends, no doubt helped by playing for the Patriots. But Steelers fans could rightly argue that Smith has been the premier 3-4 end of his era, and he's started 32 more games than Seymour this decade. Just because he's not an edge rusher doesn't mean he's not a very valuable end. Unfortunately, there isn't much to go on when grading 3-4 ends, and Seymour's four combined All-Pro honors makes him a strong pick as a second team all defensive end. For the other spot, Peppers has been a more versatile player than Freeney, but Jared Allen is hot on his heels.

First team All-Decade DEs: Jason Taylor and Michael Strahan
Second team All-Decade DEs: Richard Seymour and Julius Peppers

Defensive Tackle:

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	PLAYER
79	4	121	120	8	0	3	0	Warren Sapp
78	6	144	134	9	0	1	2	La'Roi Glover
65	4	 94	 94	6	0	4	0	Kevin Williams
65	4	101	 95	6	0	2	1	Kris Jenkins
64	3	139	126	8	0	0	1	Pat Williams
63	3	122	119	8	0	2	1	Jamal Williams
61	3	119	115	7	0	0	1	Trevor Pryce
60	2	109	105	7	0	0	1	John Henderson
60	3	117	111	8	0	0	1	Sam Adams
58	3	116	100	7	0	0	1	Marcus Stroud
55	0	132	116	8	0	0	0	Cornelius Griffin
55	4	113	106	7	0	0	0	Casey Hampton
54	0	140	133	9	0	0	1	Chris Hovan
52	2	 90	 74	6	0	2	0	Albert Haynesworth
51	3	114	112	7	0	0	1	Shaun Rogers
51	2	124	124	8	0	0	1	Bryant Young
50	2	 97	 93	6	0	1	0	Ted Washington

There are seven strong candidates at defensive tackle -- Sapp, Glover, Kevin Williams, Kris Jenkins, Jamal Williams, Pat Williams and Albert Haynesworth. Any of the latter five could have a huge season in '09 and really change these results.

The premier defensive tackles of our era can generally be classified as either as under tackles or space eaters. In an under front, the 3-technique (or under tackle) can be as effective a pass rusher as a defensive end. Sapp and Glover both had 17 sack seasons in the '00s while playing the three technique, and marginal players have put up good sack numbers while playing this position. These guys generally get the accolades and the fame, and because of that AV, likes them. But they're neither more prevalent nor more valuable than a nose tackle or big bodied defensive tackle who just eats up blockers. Unfortunately, those players do not get the credit they deserve. Comparing a penetrating tackle like Glover, Sapp or Kevin Williams to a space eater like Jamal Williams, Pat Williams or Kris Jenkins (or Shaun Rogers or Vince Wilfork) is difficult. Therefore, I'm going to force myself to grab two big uglies along with two three technique tackles on my all-decade team, regardless of what AV and the all-pro awards say.

  • The Vikings have allowed the fewest rushing yards each of the past three seasons, thanks to the dominant play of Kevin and Pat Williams. Kevin Williams' size, speed and athleticism has made him one of the most productive defensive tackles in the league; if he picks up a 5th first team all-pro nomination this year, it would be hard to leave him off the team. On the other hand, it would be foolish to ignore how much he's befitted from playing alongside a nose tackle like Pat Williams. In Pat Williams' last season in Buffalo, the Bills ranked in the top 3 in both yards per carry and rushing touchdowns allowed.
  • Jenkins was a dominant force early in the decade for Carolina, as instrumental as Julius Peppers was in giving the Panthers the best front four in the league. He had a huge season in New York in 2008 after switching to nose tackle, and he's one of the only men on the planet big enough and agile enough to be a play making nose in a 3-4 defense. He had some down years in between his All Pro seasons of '03 and '08, but another big season in 2009 would solidify his spot.
  • Albert Haynesworth is a special case, as he's neither a three technique tackle nor a guy who just eats up blocks. He does everything. Haynesworth's career started slowly, and he's only become a dominant player the past two seasons. But by the end of next season, he may have his third first-team All Pro nomination and a defensive player of the year award. He's that good. He can line up over center and beat a double team to get a sack, while still holding up very well against the run. The Titans defense the past two seasons has been short on name players and long on production — and that’s because Haynesworth makes everyone around him better. Doug’s approximate value system recognizes this; Haynesworth has 35 points of AV over the past two seasons, most in the league. How Haynesworth fares in Washington will be one of the most interesting storylines of 2009.
  • I left Sapp and Glover last, as they should be discussed together. Sapp was a member of the All-Decade team of the '90s, the only player from that team with a chance to make this one. Sapp and Glover were in their primes in the early part of the decade, and both made the NFC's Pro Bowl roster the first four seasons of the '00s. There’s no denying that Sapp had the better career and was better at his peak, but Glover’s got the cut-offs working in his favor. If this was the All-Decade team of ‘98 to ‘07, I’d take Sapp over Glover. But Sapp had only one productive season after leaving Tampa after the 2003 season, and most of his play as a 3-4 end in Oakland was ugly. Glover made six Pro Bowls this decade, for two different teams, and at two different positions (under tackle and nose tackle); he was less one dimensional than Sapp. Kevin Williams was probably more versatile than Sapp as well, and played better for longer in the '00s. Sapp, Glover and Kevin Williams are all worthy choices as dominant interior rushers. Unfortunately, we've only got two spots on the list.
  • Casey Hampton, Jamal Williams, Pat Williams and Kris Jenkins have all been terrific interior lineman this decade. Hampton has made four Pro Bowls but has yet to earn any all-pro distinctions. Jamal Williams has probably been the most consistent of the space eaters this decade, and has also picked up two first team all-pro honors. Jenkins has shown that, at his peak, he's been an unstoppable force. Pat Williams has been very good for multiple teams, and is your classic space eater. Any of these four guys would be strong picks, and it's very, very difficult to try and put them in any sort of order.

First team All-Decade DTs: La'Roi Glover (UT) and Jamal Williams (DT/NT)
Second team All-Decade DTs: Kevin Williams (UT) and Kris Jenkins (DT/NT)

Outside Linebackers:

We've left the space-eaters behind, but we've still got some 3-4/4-3 issues to deal with. I listed the "sacks over 0.5 per game" stat again, as we've got several 3-4 pass rushing linebackers on the list.

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	Sk Val
106	8	144	144	9	1	4	2	 0.0	Derrick Brooks
 79	4	138	137	9	0	1	3	17.0	Joey Porter
 66	4	 94	 91	6	0	1	1	 0.0	Lance Briggs
 64	1	143	114	7	0	1	1	 0.0	Keith Bulluck
 61	2	121	 97	7	0	1	0	 4.5	Adalius Thomas
 61	5	127	119	7	0	1	1	 3.5	Julian Peterson
 60	2	124	120	8	0	1	0	 0.0	Takeo Spikes
 57	1	140	110	8	0	1	0	 7.5	Mike Vrabel
 56	1	133	126	9	0	0	0	 7.0	Greg Ellis
 54	3	 96	 80	5	1	0	1	 8.0	Terrell Suggs
 53	1	131	113	8	0	0	0	 0.0	Marcus Washington
 51	3	106	 89	6	0	1	0	 0.0	Junior Seau
 50	3	 73	 64	4	0	1	0	10.5	Jason Gildon
 48	0	131	115	8	0	0	0	 0.0	Na'il Diggs
 47	0	 88	 88	6	0	0	0	 0.0	Jamie Sharper
 46	3	 84	 72	5	0	0	2	 3.0	LaVar Arrington
 45	3	 64	 64	4	0	2	1	21.5	DeMarcus Ware
 45	2	107	 93	6	0	0	0	 0.0	Dexter Coakley

Derrick Brooks blows everyone away, and it's not even close. He leads all outside linebackers in starts, Pro Bowls, defensive player of the year awards and first team all pro nominations. Joey Porter is a very distant #2, and is the clear top 3-4 OLB of the decade. DeMarcus Ware and James Harrison -- arguably the two best defensive players in the game today -- came on too late in the decade to warrant serious consideration.

But before we name the outside linebackers, let's take a look at the inside linebackers.

Inside Linebackers:

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	PLAYER
107	7	118	118	7	3	5	0	Ray Lewis
 97	6	137	135	9	2	4	0	Brian Urlacher
 83	6	121	119	8	0	3	2	Zach Thomas
 76	2	140	130	8	0	1	1	James Farrior
 66	4	110	101	7	0	1	1	Jeremiah Trotter
 63	5	133	133	8	0	0	2	Keith Brooking
 63	5	109	107	7	0	1	1	Al Wilson
 62	0	144	143	9	0	0	0	London Fletcher
 61	1	127	117	8	0	0	2	Tedy Bruschi
 60	1	135	132	8	0	0	2	Donnie Edwards
 56	0	119	114	8	0	0	1	Mike Peterson	

We've got three inside linebackers who, based on Pro Bowls, AV and All-Pro honors, are more distingushed than all but one outside linebacker. On the All-70s and All-80s teams, ballots were cast for two outside linebackers and one inside linebacker. But the All-90s defense eliminated the distinction, grouping all linebackers together. That team featured three outside linebackers on its first team: Derrick Thomas, Kevin Greene and Junior Seau. It might seem odd to separate out defensive tackle into two positions but to lump all linebackers together. I won't argue with that. But the reason I wanted one nose tackle was because that position is just as important as the three-technique tackle, but doesn't get nearly as much praise. That isn't the case at linebacker -- neither outside nor inside linebackers are at a systematic disadvantage vis-a-vis the other one. Most importantly, it seems wrong to exclude Brian Urlacher off the all-decade team, and I suspect the '00 All-Decade defense will again combine linebackers and have him on the squad. That's what ESPN did, and I don't think it will upset the balance of the world if I do so as well.

First team All-Decade linebackers: Ray Lewis, Derrick Brooks and Brian Urlacher

Not much needs to be said about these three. All carried their putrid offenses to Super Bowls, and have combined for 34 Pro Bowl/First-team All Pro nominations. Lewis won two DPOY awards and a SB MVP; Urlacher won a DPOY award and a defensive ROY award; Brooks won a DPOY award. These are the three dominant linebackers of the '00s.

The second team is a little harder. Joey Porter and Zach Thomas are both solid picks. Porter's been a sack machine for most of the decade and is your prototypical 3-4 outside linebacker. Thomas peaked in the early part of the decade, but he has more first-team all pros this decade than anyone besides Lewis, Brooks and Urlacher. So who should be our third second-team linebacker?

Julian Peterson, Lance Briggs and James Farrior all have good resumes. DeMarcus Ware could slide in with a big season in '09, while Patrick Willis is probably left looking at a spot on the '10s All-Decade team. After taking two inside linebackers on the first team, I'm inclined to grab two outside linebackers here. And while the above names are good, none of them stand out as "must haves" on the team.

In addition to Ware (21.5 sacks over 0.5 SK/G) and Porter (17), only Shawne Merriman (18.5) has elite sack numbers. And with only 43 games played in the decade, he's not going to make the cut. So why don't we take one of the biggest playmakers in some of the biggest games of the decade? Mike Vrabel (7.5 sacks over 0.5 SK/G) has more sacks and INTs this decade than Julian Peterson, and his post-season accomplishments are well documented. He had three sacks and two receiving touchdowns combined in the Patriots Super Bowl victories in '03 and '04. DeMarcus Ware could pass him with a big season, but for now, I'll take Vrabel and his 140 games, 8 post-season sacks, and big performances for three Super Bowl teams. Bruschi may be the better Pats linebacker, but I think we need a 3-4 outside linebacker for this team.

Second team All-Decade linebackers: Joey Porter, Zach Thomas and Mike Vrabel

Cornerbacks

You can relax -- there isn't much to debate here.

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	PLAYER
99	5	144	144	9	0	3	2	Ronde Barber
92	8	134	134	9	0	3	3	Champ Bailey
71	3	119	115	8	0	1	1	Chris McAlister
63	3	131	125	8	0	1	1	Patrick Surtain
63	4	124	123	8	0	1	0	Ty Law
61	3	127	119	8	0	1	1	Sam Madison
58	1	118	116	8	0	1	0	Samari Rolle
57	4	 91	 86	5	0	1	1	Troy Vincent
54	3	120	117	8	0	0	2	Charles Woodson
53	1	128	126	9	0	0	1	Antoine Winfield
50	1	 90	 90	6	0	1	0	Rashean Mathis

Bailey and Barber will both make the Hall of Fame, and I doubt either will have to wait long. Nnamdi Asomugha was born in the wrong year -- players born in seasons ending in a "1" will have a tough time making any all-decade team. Barber and Bailey each received three first team all pro honors; no other CB this decade has even two. The other players on the list have all been very good, and at one time or another, were arguably one of the top three corners in the game. But Bailey has been the standard for most of the decade, with Barber right behind him. Barber's the only cornerback to record 30 INTs and 20 sacks since the latter became an official statistic in 1982; the other men to reach those marks are safeties LeRoy Butler, Brian Dawkins and Rodney Harrison.

The second-team list is up for a healthy debate, but a great cover corner can be as difficult to spot as a great offensive linemen. You've got Pro Bowls, All Pros, and (before AV), not much else. Still, Chris McAlister has a terrific resume. Ignoring Barber and Bailey, he is tied for the most more combined 1st/2nd team all pro nominations, has made three Pro Bowls, has started most of the decade, and has been a part of two historically great defenses ('00 and '06). Is he a HOF corner? Probably not, but he was born in the right year to be 23 to 32 years old during the '00s. If you want a number to hang your hat on, only Bailey, Barber and Dre' Bly have more passes defended this decade. Ty Law has made four Pro Bowls this decade with two different teams, and in '05 led the league in interceptions. Like Vrabel, he's been a terrific post-season performer, with six interceptions and a decisive touchdown in the Pats upset Super Bowl win against the Rams. Troy Vincent was ESPN's first-team pick, but with just half a decade of play, I can't justify taking him over Law or McAlister.

First team All-Decade CBs: Ronde Barber and Champ Bailey
Second team All-Decade CBs: Chris McAlister and Ty Law

Safeties:

The '90s team had three strong safeties, and I don't feel any particular need to separate out the strong and free safeties. Like at linebacker, I don't think either position has a built in advantage over the other in terms of being more popular or more important, so I'm content to group them together.

AV	PB	G	GS	SEA	awards	AP1	AP2	PLAYER
79	6	124	124	8	0	4	0	Brian Dawkins
76	5	106	105	7	1	4	1	Ed Reed
70	4	137	135	9	0	1	3	Darren Sharper
69	7	121	120	8	0	1	2	John Lynch
61	5	 88	 72	5	0	2	2	Troy Polamalu
58	5	 98	 95	6	0	1	0	Roy Williams
53	2	138	138	9	0	0	0	Lawyer Milloy
53	1	100	 99	6	0	1	1	Mike Brown
53	1	137	127	8	0	0	1	Sammy Knight
53	1	106	105	7	0	1	1	Rodney Harrison
50	0	128	128	8	0	0	0	Deon Grant
47	2	118	100	7	0	0	2	Adrian Wilson

Let's throw up another table for the safeties, too:

g      	int	intyd	ff     	fr	to td	sack    tkl    	ast    	pd
124	22	 232	25	11	1	17.5	506	125	107	Brian Dawkins
106	43	1144	 6	 6	7	 5.0	342	 69	 91	Ed Reed
137	49	 954	 7	 5 	7	 6.0	523	136	102	Darren Sharper
121	14	  86	10	 5	0	 9.5	409	170	 59	John Lynch
 88	17	 210	 7	 3	2	 7.0	327	108	 61	Troy Polamalu
 98	19	 307	 9	 8	3	 6.5	417	 94	 56	Roy Williams
138	10	 105	 6	 3	0	13.0	639	243	 49	Lawyer Milloy
100	17	 275	 8	 7	7	 5.0	421	 90	 44	Mike Brown
137	30	 418	12	 9	3	 9.0	588	192	 66	Sammy Knight
106	18	 166	12	 3	1	20.5	578	191	 70	Rodney Harrison
128	23	 260	 1	 5	0	 4.5	461	100	 86	Deon Grant
118	18	 433	13	 6	4	18.5	495	114	 59	Adrian Wilson

"TO TD" stands for turnover touchdowns, which is simply fumbles returned for touchdowns plus INTs returned for touchdowns. Ed Reed has eleven career touchdowns (three via punt block and one on a punt return), but I didn't think it was fair to count those. Either way, Reed is an obvious choice. On top of his great regular season numbers, he also has five interceptions in five playoffs games, including one score. He's received the most All-Pro nominations of any safety, and along with Bob Sanders, is one of two safeties to win a DPOY award in the '00s. And, of course, there's a good chance he'll simply add to all of his numbers in 2009.

Brian Dawkins is another obvious pick -- he's been the heart of an incredible Eagles defense for the entire decade. His 25 forced fumbles lap the field, and he's been a worthy first team all-pro nominee four different times.

Darren Sharper has the most interceptions and the highest AV of the remaining safeties. In '02 and '05 he led the league in interception return yards, and he was a first team all-pro according to the Sporting News (2nd team All Pro both seasons according to the AP). He's not a sexy pick, but he's a worthy pick for our second team. That leaves one spot left, and it's time we select a strong safety.

John Lynch has the Pro Bowls, and he was a valuable member of some great defenses. He hung around too long and that will hurt his legacy for teams like this; at the end of his career, he was still making Pro Bowls but wasn't very good. Polamalu has only been a starter for five seasons so far, but by this time next year he'll have likely made his sixth Pro Bowl. He's been the most prominent member of the rejuvenated Steelers defense, and he certainly passes the look test. I'd feel more confident selecting him if he gets a first team all-pro nod after the '09 season, but I'd still take him now over the rest of the pack. Smith and Hampton were left off the defensive line in a numbers game, so let's finally give a tiebreaker to the team that has had arguably the best and most consistent defense of the decade.

Rodney Harrison fans will think he deserves the nod, and if I had to take two strong safeties, he or Lynch would be my next choice. He's got a great post-season record -- seven INTs, two sacks, one TD -- but Harrison's problem is a lack of regular season honors. One first team all pro, one second team all pro, and one Pro Bowl appearance does not make the case for a guy who has been on the most popular and successful franchises of the decade. It's possible his reputation as a dirty player has impacted his awards, but he does not rate particularly well in AV, and I don't think I can make a great case for him. If you want to switch Smith and Seymour on the defensive line, I'm fine with switching Polamalu and Harrison here.

Special Teams:

Let's call this 80% of the all-decade special teamers, as I have not yet updated my database to include the '08 season. At placekicker, using the methodology from the Greatest Field Goal Kickers Ever series, Matt Stover (+47.2) comes out on top. Behind him are Jeff Wilkins (45.6), Mike Vanderjagt (42.4), Joe Nedney (36.4) and Jason Hanson (33.4). So, Stover and Wilkins it is!

All-Decade teams select punters, but I'd be lying if I said I had anything interesting to say (for now) about punters. Shane Lechler has been a first team all pro four times this decade, and I've heard of him, so he becomes our first team punter. Brian Moorman and Todd Sauerbrun both have two first team all pro nominations, but Sauerbrun also has a second-team all pro honor. Combined with his one additional Pro Bowl berth and, of course, the fact that he made a Super Bowl this decade, makes Sauerbrun the choice.

Last summer, I talked about how to rank punt and kick returners, using Josh Cribbs as my inspiration. We can do that analysis to select our punt returner and kick returner of the decade.

Even ignoring '08, Devin Hester comes out on top in my formula measuring punt return value added over average. He's at +504, followed by Dante Hall at +480, Dennis Northcutt (+412), Allen Rossum (+382), Jermaine Lewis (+361) and Roscoe Parrish (+350). Kick returners? Terrence McGee is the surprise winner, having added 849 yards over average. Dante Hall +806 is right behind him, and Josh Cribbs is in third place with a score of +649. Cribbs wasn't bad in '08, so a good showing in '09 could be enough to vault him to the top of th elist. As it stands, with Hall already on the team, we can slide Cribbs into the all-second team kick returner slot.

Head Coach:

I can't rank the head coaches, but I can rank their coaching records. Bill Belichick (+85.3) wins going away. No surprise there, nor at runner up, where Tony Dungy is at +58.3 wins. Next on the list are Bill Cowher (+40.9), Andy Reid (+39.2), Jon Gruden (31.2), Brian Billick (+31.2) and Jeff Fisher (+27.1).

90% of the 2000s All-Decade Team

	First Team		Second Team
QB	Peyton Manning		Tom Brady
RB	LaDainian Tomlinson	Marshall Faulk
RB	Priest Holmes		Tiki Barber
WR	Terrell Owens		Marvin Harrison
WR	Randy Moss		Torry Holt
TE	Tony Gonzalez		Antonio Gates
OT	Walter Jones		Orlando Pace
OT	Jonathan Ogden		Willie Anderson
OG	Alan Faneca		Will Shields
OG	Steve Hutchinson	Brian Waters
OC	Jeff Saturday		Kevin Mawae
DE	Jason Taylor		Richard Seymour
DE	Michael Strahan		Julius Peppers
DT	La'Roi Glover		Kevin Williams
NT	Jamal Williams		Kris Jenkins
LB	Ray Lewis		Joey Porter
LB	Derrick Brooks		Zach Thomas
LB	Brian Urlacher		Mike Vrabel
CB	Champ Bailey		Chris McAlister
CB	Ronde Barber		Ty Law
S	Ed Reed			Troy Polamalu
S	Brian Dawkins		Darren Sharper
PK	Matt Stover		Jeff Wilkins
P	Shane Lechler		Todd Sauerbrun
KR	Terrence McGee		Josh Cribbs
PR	Devin Hester		Dante Hall
HC	Bill Belichick		Tony Dungy

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